Wednesday, April 20, 2016

Bernie, keep it going, going past the election . . .

There are those who argue that, given his decisive defeat in NY, Sanders should drop out of the race and leave the field to Clinton. In his new column, Frank Rich makes some telling points about why it's to Hillary's advantage to have Sanders in the race.

He writes: 

A coronation may be what the Clinton campaign now wants, but I’d suggest that Clinton has more to gain by staying in a dialogue, a debate, with Sanders, and ultimately forging some kind of communion with him and, more important, his voters, in real time.
. . .
Sanders pulling out now, or soon, would deny her that opportunity, allow Trump to monopolize the national stage all spring, and reinforce exactly the sense of entitlement Clinton needs to avoid if she is to start to reclaim a positive public image.

http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2016/04/why-clinton-shouldnt-want-bernie-to-bow-out-yet.html

Frank Rich, once the necessary lion of the NY Times op-ed page, has been vacuous or repetitive of late for nymag, but this makes perfect sense to me.

But what about later on, when Clinton runs against Trump, and, baruch hashem, beats him handily? What is Sanders to do?

I think his defeat frees Sanders; it frees him to organize and agitate for the causes he believes in passionately. It frees him to galvanize a movement, which I hope he does. He has liabilities as a candidate, which do not translate into liabilities in movement building. So far as health care goes, for example, he can fight for universal coverage better within or at the titular head of a movement than he has been able to as a candidate or would ever be able to as President.

Bernie should not drop out but should keep it coming up to and beyond the presidential election.


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