Wednesday, September 30, 1998

Institute for the Study of the Neurologically Typical


Institute for the Study of the Neurologically Typical (ISNT)
 www.theatlantic.com/unbound/citation/wc980930.htm

If you'd happened across Jon Katz's columns on Geek Force in recent editions of Hotwired, you'd likely have read pronouncements like the following:

The idea of geek pride was  . . .  stirring, ascending. The rise of the geeks has an epic feeling.

As Katz describes it, geeks are nerds plus modems; they have the nerd's affinity for technology plus a wired sociability nerds lack. The Internet is their meeting ground, and in the age of the Internet geekdom is groovy. Outsiders for so long, geeks now "bristle with attitude." Katz's insight is good so far as it goes but Katz is so concerned with the social and political ramifications of geekdom that he fails to consider any possible neurological underpinnings.

Institute for the Study of the Neurologically Typical (ISNT)


First appeared in the atlantic.com
www.theatlantic.com/unbound/citation/wc980930.htm

If you'd happened across Jon Katz's columns on Geek Force in recent editions of Hotwired, you'd likely have read pronouncements like the following:

The idea of geek pride was  . . .  stirring, ascending. The rise of the geeks has an epic feeling.

As Katz describes it, geeks are nerds plus modems; they have the nerd's affinity for technology plus a wired sociability nerds lack. The Internet is their meeting ground, and in the age of the Internet geekdom is groovy. Outsiders for so long, geeks now "bristle with attitude." Katz's insight is good so far as it goes but Katz is so concerned with the social and political ramifications of geekdom that he fails to consider any possible neurological underpinnings.